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Old 06-13-2019, 10:48 AM   #6026
hatzie
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Re: Restoring Rusty

Yep. The only purpose for the oil pressure sensor wiring to the PCM is to send the Class II serial data about oil pressure to the Class II Serial input on the instrument cluster module.
You will need to install a water temp sender for your analog gauge. I'd just remove the metric bung and drill and tap the head that doesn't host the PCM engine temp sender.
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1969 Dodge Polara 500 B383, A833 SOLD
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1976 Chevy K20, 6.5L, NV4500/NP208 SOLD
1986 M1008 CUCV SOLD
2000 GMC C2500, TD6.5L, NV4500
2005 Chevy Silverado LS 2500HD 6.0L 4L80E/NP263
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RTFM... GM Parts Books, GM Schematics, GM service manuals, and GM training materials...Please include at least the year and model in your threads. It'll be easier to answer your questions.
And please let us know if and how your repairs were successful.
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Old 06-13-2019, 10:50 AM   #6027
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Re: Restoring Rusty

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gregski View Post
I heard that too, and when it comes down to it, and I am talking 20 years as an adult (not teenager) of fiddling experience as long as your TIMING yes your timing is in order and you have the proper water pump (not over drive not under drive pulley) and you have a proper radiator and of course no air bubbles, the fan shroud is moot, it is more there for safety and protection than cooling, so it's role is to prevent the metal fans of yesteryear from cutting your fingers off and not so much for routing the air, when you are cruising at 75 MPH on the freeway there is a wall of air heading towards the engine, just sayin'
As another guy that has 20yrs experience w/vehicles.... the shroud is there for safety AND helping route/pull air through a radiator @ low/no speed. If you sit in traffic a lot, the shroud is much more important vs. @ 75mph cruise.
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Old 06-13-2019, 10:53 AM   #6028
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Re: Restoring Rusty

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As another guy that has 20yrs experience w/vehicles.... the shroud is there for safety AND helping route/pull air through a radiator @ low/no speed. If you sit in traffic a lot, the shroud is much more important vs. @ 75mph cruise.
Aww C'mon. There's no bumper to bumper traffic in Sacramento...

Getting serious again. Undercooling at low speed is the reason you fab a shroud for electric fans and you don't discard the shroud for mechanical fans.
Adding wings between the radiator and the rad support to direct air intake from outside the engine bay keeps you from short circuiting the airflow and overheating the engine when you actually have enough airflow.

Around 2005 or so GM added PCM controlled electric fans to the lower displacement 1/2 ton rigs. Not sure if the earlier PCMs can be programmed to add this feature or not.
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1969 Dodge Polara 500 B383, A833 SOLD
1972 Ford F250 FE390, NP435/NP205 SOLD
1976 Chevy K20, 6.5L, NV4500/NP208 SOLD
1986 M1008 CUCV SOLD
2000 GMC C2500, TD6.5L, NV4500
2005 Chevy Silverado LS 2500HD 6.0L 4L80E/NP263
2009 Impala SS LS4 V8


RTFM... GM Parts Books, GM Schematics, GM service manuals, and GM training materials...Please include at least the year and model in your threads. It'll be easier to answer your questions.
And please let us know if and how your repairs were successful.

Last edited by hatzie; 06-13-2019 at 11:03 AM.
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Old 06-13-2019, 11:04 AM   #6029
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Re: Restoring Rusty

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Originally Posted by hatzie View Post
You will need to install a water temp sender for your analog gauge. I'd just remove the metric bung and drill and tap the head that doesn't host the PCM engine temp sender.
Yup, but I went the adapter route, not sure if that will significantly effect the accuracy, but it's good enuff for the girls we date!
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Old 06-13-2019, 11:54 AM   #6030
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Re: Restoring Rusty

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Yup, but I went the adapter route, not sure if that will significantly effect the accuracy, but it's good enuff for the girls we date!
As long as it doesn't shroud the end of the thermistor it shouldn't cause problems.
If the sensor is shrouded it'll be lazy and lag on faster temp changes.
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1959 M35A2 LDT465-1D SOLD
1967 Dodge W200 B383, NP420/NP201 SOLD
1969 Dodge Polara 500 B383, A833 SOLD
1972 Ford F250 FE390, NP435/NP205 SOLD
1976 Chevy K20, 6.5L, NV4500/NP208 SOLD
1986 M1008 CUCV SOLD
2000 GMC C2500, TD6.5L, NV4500
2005 Chevy Silverado LS 2500HD 6.0L 4L80E/NP263
2009 Impala SS LS4 V8


RTFM... GM Parts Books, GM Schematics, GM service manuals, and GM training materials...Please include at least the year and model in your threads. It'll be easier to answer your questions.
And please let us know if and how your repairs were successful.
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Old 06-13-2019, 12:50 PM   #6031
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Re: Restoring Rusty

I brought my Temp. sender to a local machine shop and had it turned to size. He charged me $10 and it reads accurately.
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Old 06-14-2019, 08:22 PM   #6032
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Re: Restoring Rusty

just wanted to share my Early Bird Gets The Worm junk yard score, picked up two throttle cables, the longer one off of a 99 Silverado and the shorter one from a handsum '01 GMC Sierra, also grabbed a DAYCO 71990 lower radiator hose which happens to fit perfectamento (don't ask how I managed to loose the other hose clamp, it was there one second and gone into the abyss the next, ha ha) so happy
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Old 06-14-2019, 08:25 PM   #6033
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Re: Restoring Rusty

so it's all plumbed up but the fuel system, as I am waiting on AN hose fittings from Summit to arrive

the transmission cooler hard lines were a royal P.I.A. and I may redo the last 18 inches in AN hoses to mate up to the radiator since I think I pinched one of 'em
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Old 06-15-2019, 08:00 AM   #6034
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Re: Restoring Rusty

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Originally Posted by Rich84 View Post
I brought my Temp. sender to a local machine shop and had it turned to size. He charged me $10 and it reads accurately.
Rich machine shops are a thing of the past here in Northern California, they used to be attached to most NAPA and CarQuest shops but now I think there may be one or two left and they are a nice drive across town, more gas than the $10 charge, plus no one will lift a wrench for $10 bucks here in Sacramento, California.
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Old 06-15-2019, 12:32 PM   #6035
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Re: Restoring Rusty

100% accurate ^^^
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Old 06-15-2019, 02:38 PM   #6036
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Re: Restoring Rusty

This is why I have my South Bend 13x36, 1912 Monarch 14x42 Model A, and my 7x16 Little Green Chinese Monster. I bought the Model A for scrap value and rebuilt it using itself...
Not to mention the Burke and Milwaukee mills.

Self sufficiency is a wonderful thing. I can make and adapt all kinds of things with the propane furnace, welders, and the machine tools. My heirs will hate me... Especially when they try to move the 28" Cincinnati Shaper. The big Lathes and even the 6,000 lb horizontal milling machine are much lighter than that 9,800lb beast.
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1959 M35A2 LDT465-1D SOLD
1967 Dodge W200 B383, NP420/NP201 SOLD
1969 Dodge Polara 500 B383, A833 SOLD
1972 Ford F250 FE390, NP435/NP205 SOLD
1976 Chevy K20, 6.5L, NV4500/NP208 SOLD
1986 M1008 CUCV SOLD
2000 GMC C2500, TD6.5L, NV4500
2005 Chevy Silverado LS 2500HD 6.0L 4L80E/NP263
2009 Impala SS LS4 V8


RTFM... GM Parts Books, GM Schematics, GM service manuals, and GM training materials...Please include at least the year and model in your threads. It'll be easier to answer your questions.
And please let us know if and how your repairs were successful.
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Old 06-15-2019, 07:08 PM   #6037
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Re: Restoring Rusty

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Originally Posted by hatzie View Post
This is why I have my South Bend 13x36, 1912 Monarch 14x42 Model A, and my 7x16 Little Green Chinese Monster. I bought the Model A for scrap value and rebuilt it using itself...
Not to mention the Burke and Milwaukee mills.

Self sufficiency is a wonderful thing. I can make and adapt all kinds of things with the propane furnace, welders, and the machine tools. My heirs will hate me... Especially when they try to move the 28" Cincinnati Shaper. The big Lathes and even the 6,000 lb horizontal milling machine are much lighter than that 9,800lb beast.
are you looking for a house trained ROOMMATE, I'm excellent with the broom and dust pan!
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Old 06-16-2019, 05:43 PM   #6038
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Re: Restoring Rusty

Fuel System... well, how hard could it be?

Sending Unit Instructions for the pump replacement are comical... and the diagram labels all the obvious parts and none of the nipple outlets and there's three of em, ha ha, hope I done did it right.

one's got to cut the hose barb ends off in order to slip on the compression AN fittings. Just take your time and try to cut the metal and not your hand.

two of the pedestals have to be cut off one under the 3/8ths supply line and the other under the 5/16ths return line. I went the extra mile and filed down any burrs, cause that's how we roll in NorCal baby!
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Old 06-16-2019, 05:45 PM   #6039
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Re: Restoring Rusty

and the compressor fittings are on, let's hope and pray they don't leak

looks nais, real naise
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Last edited by Gregski; 06-17-2019 at 08:54 AM.
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Old 06-17-2019, 06:06 AM   #6040
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Re: Restoring Rusty

After seeing all this purty fuel supply stuff, I got to thinkin'. Did he convert to a returnless system? Had to go back and look at earlier pics, and I swear I see a pressure regulator on the left fuel rail, meaning you have an early GenIII engine with a supply/return fuel rail. I'm hoping I'm wrong...
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Old 06-17-2019, 07:46 AM   #6041
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Re: Restoring Rusty

Why didn't you just buy a GM fuel module (jet pump) for this setup? I'm so thankful I was educated about them on this forum.
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Old 06-17-2019, 08:54 AM   #6042
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Re: Restoring Rusty

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Originally Posted by LeesTruk View Post
After seeing all this purty fuel supply stuff, I got to thinkin'. Did he convert to a returnless system? Had to go back and look at earlier pics, and I swear I see a pressure regulator on the left fuel rail, meaning you have an early GenIII engine with a supply/return fuel rail. I'm hoping I'm wrong...
You are absolutely spot on, this is an early Gen III motor [ahem] engine (2001) and it still does have a 5/16ths return line which I am keeping.
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Old 06-17-2019, 08:55 AM   #6043
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Re: Restoring Rusty

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Originally Posted by buffydores View Post
Why didn't you just buy a GM fuel module (jet pump) for this setup? I'm so thankful I was educated about them on this forum.
first I hear of it, please go on... share a pic or part number
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Old 06-17-2019, 03:48 PM   #6044
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Re: Restoring Rusty

Keep the stuff you purchased, but you won't need that Corvette style filter/regulator. Just plumb your fuel rail return line directly to the fuel tank sending unit. For the filter, just get a Silverado style filter and modify it accordingly. If your truck has a charcoal cannister up front, you can use that to vent your gas tank (middle nipple on the sender) so you won't get any gas fumes in your garage. Let the cannister vent to the atmosphere. If you decide later on, to use an '87 gas tank w/antislosh pocket, be aware that the inlet nipple on the tank is 1 3/4" whereas your tank inlet is 1/1/4", so your fuel fill hose won't fit. Interestingly, the original hose starts out at 1 3/4" ,so all you have to do is just replace the hose with a hose from Gates. I've enclosed pic's;
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Old 06-17-2019, 04:10 PM   #6045
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Re: Restoring Rusty

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Originally Posted by LeesTruk View Post
Keep the stuff you purchased, but you won't need that Corvette style filter/regulator. Just plumb your fuel rail return line directly to the fuel tank sending unit. For the filter, just get a Silverado style filter and modify it accordingly. If your truck has a charcoal cannister up front, you can use that to vent your gas tank (middle nipple on the sender) so you won't get any gas fumes in your garage. Let the cannister vent to the atmosphere. If you decide later on, to use an '87 gas tank w/antislosh pocket, be aware that the inlet nipple on the tank is 1 3/4" whereas your tank inlet is 1/1/4", so your fuel fill hose won't fit. Interestingly, the original hose starts out at 1 3/4" ,so all you have to do is just replace the hose with a hose from Gates. I've enclosed pic's;
thank you, I bet that bigger hose takes care of the at the fuel pump filling woes
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Old 06-23-2019, 09:59 PM   #6046
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Re: Restoring Rusty - LS Lesson Learned #5

I thought that once I install an LS engine in my truck I can put my Innovate wideband DLG-1 AFR gauge on the shelf, and I wouldn't need it no more as the PCM computer manages all that for me now.

I couldn't be more wrong! The O2 sensors on the factory ('99-07) GM trucks which we get our donor Gen III LS engines from use narrow band oxygen sensors, and all these sensors can say is Too Lean or Too Rich depending on the exhaust gases being emitted however they can not tell us how much too lean or how much too rich we are running. Which brings us to...

LS Lesson Learned #5 - In order to tune your LS engine you still need a UEGO (universal exhaust gas oxygen sensor) aka a wideband AFR gauge, word on the street is that the four wire won't do and you must use a fire wire O2 sensor. Now you don't need to run one in your vehicle permanently you can just unscrew one of the factory narrow band sensors and screw your wideband in temporarily as you tune the engine with your laptop.
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Old 06-23-2019, 10:03 PM   #6047
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Re: Restoring Rusty

time to get my read on: Designing and Tuning High-Performance FUEL INJECTION SYSTEMS

Curious to know if any of you have read this book, and what you thought of it?

Any other recommends?

Update after having read it: If you are to read one book on EFI tuning make it something else, ha ha. Let's just state the facts this book was written prior to 2009, yes a decade after our beloved LS engines came out but a decade has gone by since. Also this book culminates in tuning a '69 Corvette with a 427 big block with an Edelbrock dual plane aluminum intake with port injection and a Megasquirt ECU!
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Old 06-24-2019, 12:38 AM   #6048
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Re: Restoring Rusty

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Originally Posted by Gregski View Post
first I hear of it, please go on... share a pic or part number
Sorry for the delay. Basically, most of the LS trucks of the mid 2000s use a fuel module instead of a basic fuel pump. The fuel module has plenty of advantageous over a traditional pump. Here's Phillip's fabulous explanation:

http://67-72chevytrucks.com/vboard/s...&postcount=208

Basically, the jet pump solves the problems of sloshing fuel and maximizing cooling of the fuel pump. You'll get better piece of mind.

Read this also: https://www.vaporworx.com/documentation/fuel-modules/
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Old 06-24-2019, 11:41 AM   #6049
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Re: Restoring Rusty

Quote:
Originally Posted by buffydores View Post
Sorry for the delay. Basically, most of the LS trucks of the mid 2000s use a fuel module instead of a basic fuel pump. The fuel module has plenty of advantageous over a traditional pump. Here's Phillip's fabulous explanation:

http://67-72chevytrucks.com/vboard/s...&postcount=208

Basically, the jet pump solves the problems of sloshing fuel and maximizing cooling of the fuel pump. You'll get better piece of mind.

Read this also: https://www.vaporworx.com/documentation/fuel-modules/
So...… 2005 & after or what year model was the change on the 5.3 set-ups in trucks? I knew about the fuel modules but uncertain what years they started to be available.
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89CCDually-Driver/Tow Truck
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All Fleetsides

Building a small, high rpm engine
with the perfect bore, stroke and rod ratio is very impressive...
like a highly skilled Morrocan sword fighter with a Damascus Steel Scimitar.

Cubic inches is like Indiana Jones with a cheap pistol....
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Old 07-05-2019, 02:15 PM   #6050
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Re: Restoring Rusty

How is Rusty coming along? Been checking every day.
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