The 1947 - Present Chevrolet & GMC Truck Message Board Network







Register or Log In To remove these advertisements.

Go Back   The 1947 - Present Chevrolet & GMC Truck Message Board Network > 47 - Current classic GM Trucks > The 1969 - 1972 Blazers and Jimmys Message Board

Web 67-72chevytrucks.com


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 10-23-2003, 05:43 PM   #1
TRUK
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Carlsbad, CA
Posts: 38
Wheel Spacers - Good thing?

I have always thought that the 3" shorter rear axle made the stance of a 1st Gen Blazer look a little off. Recently I saw a review on coloradok5.com about wheel spacers. I was thinking that this may be a good idea.

Then a trusted mechanic told me that this 3" difference was by design so that the rear wheels did not track right on top of the front wheel tracks. This may help in a mud situation and could give the rear wheels something to bite on being slightly offset.

Well.. my new K5 will never see the kind of off road action my old K5 saw on a regular basis. So, I'm not that concerned about the extreme off road traction.

Has onyone tried the rear wheel spacers? Does your truck look better? Track better on the street or off road? CK5.com seems to think so.

Here is a link to the review: http://www.coloradok5.com/wheelspacers.shtml
__________________
TRUK
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
2BLUE72 K5 BLAZER 4X4
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
TRUK is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-24-2003, 01:13 AM   #2
JayDubBlazer
go cyclones
 
JayDubBlazer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Ames, IA
Posts: 1,884
I would like to find out as well. The number of wheels availble for our trucks would greatly grow if we could use spacers.
__________________
Wes

My 72 Blazer

PROJECT OLE GREEN

1972 Blazer 4X4 350/700R4
2013 Toyota Tacoma Access Cab 4.0L
JayDubBlazer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-24-2003, 01:07 PM   #3
TRUK
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Carlsbad, CA
Posts: 38
I like the GM Stock Rally Wheel look. I talked to the owner of Stockton Wheel yesterday. They custom make wheels, replicas or modify what ever you may want.

He can make a 15x10 GM Rally for me if I want (can go all the way to 15x14 or even 16" or 17" wheels.

He also will build a wheel with what ever backside spacing you want. Said he does it all the time. So, I could do this instead of 1.5" spacers. Of course.. I would no longer be able to rotate tires easily.

http://www.stocktonwheel.com These guys have been building wheels since the horse and buggy days.

Thoughts?
__________________
TRUK
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
2BLUE72 K5 BLAZER 4X4
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
TRUK is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-24-2003, 01:46 PM   #4
bouncytruck
SKINNY TIRES RULE!
 
bouncytruck's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Bothell, WA
Posts: 11,050
I think that several board members on CK5 have the wheel spacers. I haven't heard anyone say they were bad or caused a problem yet. There are a lot of Blazer owners who find the track widths to be un-attractive.
__________________
bouncytruck 1972 K5
The Hauler 1994 K1500 Suburban
The Daily2010 Kia Soul
Wife's Ride2014 Fiat 500L
bouncytruck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-24-2003, 02:48 PM   #5
RED72blazer
urban fourwheelin
 
RED72blazer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Seattle
Posts: 996
I Heard that the difference was to make the turning radius better. but that is just what I heard
__________________
1972 K5 Blazer with Cummins 4BT, NV4500 swap in the parts gathering stage.
RED72blazer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-24-2003, 04:26 PM   #6
CRRoy71
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Mont Belvieu, TX
Posts: 852
I have them, and I don't have anything bad to say about them.
They make it look so much better, my turning radius does not seem to be effected, and I think the theory about tracking is non-sense. IMO
__________________
Chris

'92 ext. cab s/b 4.3L "Sparky"
'04 crew cab 2500 4x4 6.0L
CRRoy71 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-29-2003, 12:31 PM   #7
72beast
TONYP
 
72beast's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: So Cal
Posts: 100
are you guys looking for these...
$125.00 shipped with all the nuts and lugs...

__________________
72 K/5
350/205
SOFT-TOP
DOUG THORLEY HEADERS
A/C
CUSTOM REAR BUMPER
http://www.socalbigdawgs.com/tr/7.18.03/DSC04290.JPG
72beast is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-29-2003, 09:08 PM   #8
TRUK
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Carlsbad, CA
Posts: 38
That is what I am looking for in a 1.5". Order direct from you? I was looking the www.performancewheel.com spacers. How do these compare?
__________________
TRUK
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
2BLUE72 K5 BLAZER 4X4
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
TRUK is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-30-2003, 01:07 AM   #9
72beast
TONYP
 
72beast's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: So Cal
Posts: 100
I use 6061 T6 alum...its the best you can use and I think they use the same...
I have 1-1/4" inch thick spacers and 1" inch spacers...
__________________
72 K/5
350/205
SOFT-TOP
DOUG THORLEY HEADERS
A/C
CUSTOM REAR BUMPER
http://www.socalbigdawgs.com/tr/7.18.03/DSC04290.JPG
72beast is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-03-2003, 01:21 AM   #10
'89Z71
Registered User
 
'89Z71's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Star Prairie WI
Posts: 392
72beast- Are you selling a set of 4 for $125 or a set of 2? I might be interested in some 1" spacers. And are those custom made by you? TIA, DK
__________________
'89 GMC Sierra Z71 -"Scream'n Demon"

*** LOUD PIPES SAVE LIVES ***
My Truck
'89Z71 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-20-2003, 03:15 AM   #11
blazerslave
Registered User
 
blazerslave's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: Valencia, CA
Posts: 96
Re: Wheel Spacers - Good thing?

Quote:
Originally posted by TRUK
I have always thought that the 3" shorter rear axle made the stance of a 1st Gen Blazer look a little off. Recently I saw a review on coloradok5.com about wheel spacers. I was thinking that this may be a good idea.

Then a trusted mechanic told me that this 3" difference was by design so that the rear wheels did not track right on top of the front wheel tracks. This may help in a mud situation and could give the rear wheels something to bite on being slightly offset.

[/url]
Does this mean we can run 1.5" spacers on each of the rear wheels to even the front and rear wheels and have the Blazer appear to be symmetrical?

Mike-
blazerslave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-20-2003, 12:43 PM   #12
72beast
TONYP
 
72beast's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: So Cal
Posts: 100
I don't think mudd would care if the tire was 3'inch's off set per side, now snow might be different...
most guys add an 1"inch spacer to the rears of there trucks...
__________________
72 K/5
350/205
SOFT-TOP
DOUG THORLEY HEADERS
A/C
CUSTOM REAR BUMPER
http://www.socalbigdawgs.com/tr/7.18.03/DSC04290.JPG
72beast is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-20-2003, 06:24 PM   #13
CRRoy71
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Mont Belvieu, TX
Posts: 852
Re: Re: Wheel Spacers - Good thing?

Quote:
Originally posted by blazerslave


Does this mean we can run 1.5" spacers on each of the rear wheels to even the front and rear wheels and have the Blazer appear to be symmetrical?

Mike-
That's what I have, and it looks much better.
__________________
Chris

'92 ext. cab s/b 4.3L "Sparky"
'04 crew cab 2500 4x4 6.0L
CRRoy71 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-20-2003, 07:28 PM   #14
blazerslave
Registered User
 
blazerslave's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: Valencia, CA
Posts: 96
Re: Re: Re: Wheel Spacers - Good thing?

Quote:
Originally posted by CRRoy71


That's what I have, and it looks much better.
Thanks!

The spacers will be the icing on the cake!
__________________
"If you choose not to decide . . . you still have made a choice."

Last edited by blazerslave; 11-20-2003 at 07:34 PM.
blazerslave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-20-2003, 07:34 PM   #15
bpmcgee
Registered User
 
bpmcgee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Northern Illinois
Posts: 2,181
My understanding is that wheel spacers increase the bending force on your axle bearings by lengthening the lever arm of the wheels. These would have the same effect as putting really wide tires on the vehicle -- expect shorter axle bearing life.

This is just what I've read. My experience in this area is zero.

Brian
__________________
1961 GMC Suburban
bpmcgee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-2019, 08:41 PM   #16
Ryanz
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Saskatoon, SK - Canada
Posts: 85
Re: Wheel Spacers - Good thing?

Quote:
Originally Posted by blazerslave View Post
Thanks!

The spacers will be the icing on the cake!
I know this thread on rear spacers is from a LONG time ago - but did you ever have trouble with the spacers? I don't do any 4x4ing. I use mine as a daily driver around town in the summer. Some highway driving, as well as trips up to 3 hours one way.

Thanks.
Ryanz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-29-2019, 02:13 AM   #17
argonaut
Senior Member
 
argonaut's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Long Beach, CA
Posts: 1,752
Re: Wheel Spacers - Good thing?

I've had mine on for only a year, but no problems so far. 1.5" on each side of the rear.

The spacers don't place any increased stress on the bearings. To weight of the truck bearing down on the bearing is the same either way.
__________________
Jason M. @argonaut62

1972 K5 Blazer CST, Turquoise
1966 K20 Short Fleet Pickup, Big Ugly
1964 C10 Short Fleet, Gertrude

2002 Porsche 911 Turbo
2001 Porsche 911 Carrera
1996 Ford Bronco XLT

2008 Honda CBR1000RR
2005 Honda RC51
1981 Honda CB750C


No dis-assemble Johnny Five! No dis-assemble!
argonaut is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-29-2019, 10:53 AM   #18
hemi43
Registered User
 
hemi43's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Ontario Canada
Posts: 1,103
Re: Wheel Spacers - Good thing?

Quote:
Originally Posted by argonaut View Post
I've had mine on for only a year, but no problems so far. 1.5" on each side of the rear.

The spacers don't place any increased stress on the bearings. To weight of the truck bearing down on the bearing is the same either way.
Lets clarify spacers VS adapters; Spacers are exactly that, a plate with holes in it. An adapter bolts onto the existing studs and has it's own separate set of studs.

Spacers should NEVER be used, and in fact are illegal here in Ontario Canada.
Adapters should only be used in the rear and never on the front. The problem has nothing to do with bearing stress, but what it does is change front end geometry, specifically scrub radius.

I machined my own adapters for the rear of my Blazer ( 1.5") and it made a huge difference in the way the truck looks going down the road.
Be careful of cheap Chinese adapters !! They are a cast piece machined to look like billet stock, and they use very poor material.
__________________
The one that dies with the most tools, wins !
hemi43 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-29-2019, 01:10 PM   #19
Blazerowner
Senior Member
 
Blazerowner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Sutter, Ca
Posts: 1,624
Re: Wheel Spacers - Good thing?

Do you a have some pictures? I would think it looks more uniform.
__________________
Kirk
72 Blazer CST 4wd highlander
70 Chevelle Malibu
Blazerowner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-29-2019, 10:19 PM   #20
argonaut
Senior Member
 
argonaut's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Long Beach, CA
Posts: 1,752
Re: Wheel Spacers - Good thing?

I must disagree wholeheartedly that "spacers" should not be used. So long as they are made from an appropriate material and are used with studs or bolts of the appropriate length to achieve the proper thread engagement then there is really no issue with a modest thickness spacer. The load path is still through the studs to the wheel, which sandwiches the spacer. So as long as toque and thread engagement are adequate, there should be no problems. Additionally for years different automotive companies have design cars that uses such "spacers" from the factory.

"Adapters" on the other hand can be even more dangerous, especially if not designed properly. In this design the load path is through the studs to the adapter, then through the adapter itself to the secondary studs, then to the wheel. So the critical failure point it the adapter itself. If I cracks or fails your wheel will decouple completely.

That said, I'm using 1.5" aluminum "adapters" (I still call these spacers, as they are spacing the wheels out, not adapting a different bolt pattern, but just semantics) on the rear of my blazer. I dont trust them completely but I inspect them regularly for cracks and fatigue. All-steel adapters would be a different story. You'll have to proceed at your own risk.

I certainly would not recommend that anyone use "spacers" without installing longer studs. In fact, even if you are using aluminum wheels you may need longer studs since the original studs are short, being designed for use with steel wheels.
__________________
Jason M. @argonaut62

1972 K5 Blazer CST, Turquoise
1966 K20 Short Fleet Pickup, Big Ugly
1964 C10 Short Fleet, Gertrude

2002 Porsche 911 Turbo
2001 Porsche 911 Carrera
1996 Ford Bronco XLT

2008 Honda CBR1000RR
2005 Honda RC51
1981 Honda CB750C


No dis-assemble Johnny Five! No dis-assemble!
argonaut is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-30-2019, 05:00 PM   #21
hemi43
Registered User
 
hemi43's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Ontario Canada
Posts: 1,103
Re: Wheel Spacers - Good thing?

Quote:
Originally Posted by argonaut View Post
I must disagree wholeheartedly that "spacers" should not be used. So long as they are made from an appropriate material and are used with studs or bolts of the appropriate length to achieve the proper thread engagement then there is really no issue with a modest thickness spacer. The load path is still through the studs to the wheel, which sandwiches the spacer. So as long as toque and thread engagement are adequate, there should be no problems. Additionally for years different automotive companies have design cars that uses such "spacers" from the factory.

"Adapters" on the other hand can be even more dangerous, especially if not designed properly. In this design the load path is through the studs to the adapter, then through the adapter itself to the secondary studs, then to the wheel. So the critical failure point it the adapter itself. If I cracks or fails your wheel will decouple completely.

That said, I'm using 1.5" aluminum "adapters" (I still call these spacers, as they are spacing the wheels out, not adapting a different bolt pattern, but just semantics) on the rear of my blazer. I dont trust them completely but I inspect them regularly for cracks and fatigue. All-steel adapters would be a different story. You'll have to proceed at your own risk.

I certainly would not recommend that anyone use "spacers" without installing longer studs. In fact, even if you are using aluminum wheels you may need longer studs since the original studs are short, being designed for use with steel wheels.
I'n not sure what your background is, but I've been a Tool Maker for over 35 years and now have my own shop specializing in aftermarket race car components, so I do know what I'm talking about.
The problem with a spacer is that it puts too much load at the base of the stud, and that's where they fail. Using a longer stud will only increase the problem because the rim now has more leverage to snap the stud.
The face of the rim MUST be bolted to a non-movable surface like the axle flange or an adapter. I agree what you say about the load path of the stud, but what you fail to mention is that you have rotational forces acting on these studs and that where the problem lies.
Telling people to use a longer stud is not only bad advice, but dangerous advice !!
__________________
The one that dies with the most tools, wins !

Last edited by hemi43; 09-30-2019 at 05:06 PM.
hemi43 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-30-2019, 06:27 PM   #22
jaros44sr
Senior Member
 
jaros44sr's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Philadelphia, Pa. 19454
Posts: 8,443
Re: Wheel Spacers - Good thing?

Quote:
Originally Posted by hemi43 View Post
I'n not sure what your background is, but I've been a Tool Maker for over 35 years and now have my own shop specializing in aftermarket race car components, so I do know what I'm talking about.
The problem with a spacer is that it puts too much load at the base of the stud, and that's where they fail. Using a longer stud will only increase the problem because the rim now has more leverage to snap the stud.
The face of the rim MUST be bolted to a non-movable surface like the axle flange or an adapter. I agree what you say about the load path of the stud, but what you fail to mention is that you have rotational forces acting on these studs and that where the problem lies.
Telling people to use a longer stud is not only bad advice, but dangerous advice !!
OK Hemi, you convinced me, I'll switch from spacers to adapters, any company you recommend, posted by another t&d guy with 50 years OJT
__________________
Semper Fi...Uncle Sam, you da man

All parts offered to help are free, unless otherwise noted

Dont try this stuff in my build thread, unless you have 55 years of mechanical OTJ training
SAFETY FIRST

AS usual, off topic

They say your mind goes second, can't remember the first


Jim
jaros44sr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-30-2019, 07:21 PM   #23
hemi43
Registered User
 
hemi43's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Ontario Canada
Posts: 1,103
Re: Wheel Spacers - Good thing?

Quote:
Originally Posted by jaros44sr View Post
OK Hemi, you convinced me, I'll switch from spacers to adapters, any company you recommend, posted by another t&d guy with 50 years OJT
I made my own for a couple reasons. One is that all this stuff is made in China out of crap material. Most of the ones I've seen look like they were machined from billet stock material, but in actual fact they are made from castings machined to dupe the consumer into thinking it's a quality product. I can't recommend a manufacturer, but you will get what you pay for. I would stick with an American company that guarantees they use 6061-T6.
The other reason I made my own is that they don't make a 6 bolt adapter for my Blazer because I upgraded my studs to 1/2-20. All I could find were adapters with the stock 7/16 studs or the newer 14mm studs which wouldn't fit.

It might be difficult to convert from spacers to adapters because usually the spacers are thin. The minimum thickness of an adapter to use IMO should be at least 1" thick. Anything thinner I wouldn't trust.
__________________
The one that dies with the most tools, wins !
hemi43 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-30-2019, 11:15 PM   #24
argonaut
Senior Member
 
argonaut's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Long Beach, CA
Posts: 1,752
Re: Wheel Spacers - Good thing?

Hemi43, I certainly respect where you are coming from and your experience. Since you asked, I'm an engineer.


Fasteners such as wheel studs or bolts are meant to work in tension to apply a clamping 'normal' force, perpendicular to the hub surface . This normal force in turn creates a high frictional force between the clamped surfaces the surface of the wheel and the hub, or for the sake of this discussion, the wheel, spacer and hub. This frictional force is what transfers rotational torque between the hub and the wheel, as well as vertical forces from the mass of the vehicle, or any other loads in the same plane as the hub surface.

Now I would agree that in general, a larger negative offset will put increased tension on the studs or bolts. Perhaps more than the yield limit. However, this is not a function of the spacer, it is a function of total effective wheel offset. One can achieve the same effective offset by using a high offset wheel, or a low offset wheel plus a spacer, or a low offset wheel plus an adapter. The stud or bolt in tension will not know the difference.

Obviously there are other factors such as the cyclical loading and unloading of the studs as the wheel spins. As well as the lateral loading which adds further tension to studs. As well as the design of the spacer or adapter and the materials used for the studs, bolts, spacer, adapter, etc.

While a zero offset would be ideal, it is not achievable on our trucks if the wheels and tires are too wide, or the wheels are too small a diameter.



Now back to the actual scenario here, I am not advocating the use of 1.5" thick spacers, or so-called adapters. Neither are a good functional choice. Lets face it, anyone using them, including me, is doing so for aesthetic reasons.

If you want a truck that drives well use a 7" wide wheel with a neutral offset. Use 10" section-width tires and no extra spacers or adapters. I guarantee that your truck will handle and steer much better.

Cheers. And good luck with whatever you decide.
__________________
Jason M. @argonaut62

1972 K5 Blazer CST, Turquoise
1966 K20 Short Fleet Pickup, Big Ugly
1964 C10 Short Fleet, Gertrude

2002 Porsche 911 Turbo
2001 Porsche 911 Carrera
1996 Ford Bronco XLT

2008 Honda CBR1000RR
2005 Honda RC51
1981 Honda CB750C


No dis-assemble Johnny Five! No dis-assemble!

Last edited by argonaut; 10-01-2019 at 02:15 PM.
argonaut is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-30-2019, 11:20 PM   #25
Blazerowner
Senior Member
 
Blazerowner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Sutter, Ca
Posts: 1,624
Re: Wheel Spacers - Good thing?

So back to my question. Any pictures with the 1.5 adapter on the rear? I would like to see the difference. I’m considering a set in the future.
__________________
Kirk
72 Blazer CST 4wd highlander
70 Chevelle Malibu
Blazerowner is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:17 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Copyright 1997-2013 67-72chevytrucks.com